Click here to look for "chess" with the Google search engine.   Hello friend!     ...............    Welcome to one of the best {private} chess sites around. (Recognized as such by several national chess federations and also "C.J.A." Site of The Year for 2004.)     ................     Check out my School of Tactics!!  ..........  Many improvements and NEW PAGES!!!!   (Be sure to check the T.L.A. in 'Chess Life' for the tournaments in your area.)  Thanks, and have a great day!!!

   A FIDE "Top 100" site.  
  Best site, CJA, for 2004.

All the 
best 
in chess.
(TM)

(Navigation bar 
directly below.)

 

*******

Keep watching these pages as they grow and change!!

  A.J. Goldsby, 2015. 
  (All rights reserved.) 

****************

    Click  HERE 
     to see my       
    Chess Items.  

  ****************  

Official PayPal Seal

****************

Buy a book  
from Amazon.com
(And help me out as well!)

****************

 Click  HERE ...
 to see a list of the businesses that help to sponsor all of my chess efforts.


    A really hot dragon ...   


 Click  HERE  to see an explanation of the symbols that I commonly use when I annotate any chess game.   

 Click  HERE  to replay this game  ...  on another server.    


  Aleksander Sznapik (2480) - Davor Komljenovic (2512);  
 
[B78]  
 
ICT, Master's  
 
  Biel (Bienne), Switzerland; 1987.  

min09_medal.gif, 02 KB

  [A.J. Goldsby I]  

An excellent game with a blistering finish here.   

 1.e4 c52.Nf3 d63.d4 cxd44.Nxd4 Nf65.Nc3 g6 (Sicilian. Dragon)   
 6.Be3 Bg77.f3 Nc68.Bc4 Bd79.Qd2 Rc810.Bb3 0-011.h4 h5 ('!?')   
This is GM Andrew Soltis's contribution to the overall theory of this line. 
(One key game would be Soltis's win over L. Barczay from the Reggio Emilia, 1970.)  

min09_pos1.gif, 10 KB

  2rq1rk1/pp1bppb1/2np1np1/7p/3NP2P/1BN1BP2/PPPQ2P1/R3K2R w  

 

The idea is that this might slow down Black on the Kingside just long enough to make something happen on the opposite side of the chess board.  

 

     [ The other main pathway is:  
       11...Ne512.0-0-0 Nc413.Bxc4 Rxc414.h5 Nxh515.g4,  "+/="  
        when White has a strong attack.  
        [ See MCO-14, page # 271; columns # 07 & # 08. (And all the notes   
          that pertain to these two columns as well.) ]  

       Also reference the two following clashes:   
       (#1.)  G. Kasparov - J. Piket; / Tilburg, NED; 1989.   

       (#2.)  A. Karpov - V. Korchnoi; / Candidates Match (Game # 02) 
                 /
Moscow, USSR; 1974
. ]   

 

 12.0-0-0 Ne513.Bg5! Rc5!;   
This is all book. (Any real Dragon player would tell you this.)   

 

 14.Kb1!?  
At first, this move used to be considered a waste of time for White. However, today ... 
its one of the top choices of most masters. (See the latest Fritz Power-Book.)  

     [ 14.Rdg1 Nc4; "~"  is unclear. ]   

 

 14...b5 (Probably - '!')   
White's K-side attack is getting menacing, so Black must whip up some play on the opposite side of the board. (Or 14...Re8!?) 

Timing is everything in chess, if 14...a5?!; then simply 15.a4!, and Black gets stymied on one side of the board long enough so that his King gets boiled in oil.   

 

 15.g4! a5!  
Many different sources, (MCO, The Informant, NIC, Mayer, etc.); give this as Black's best shot.   

     [ Instead after the moves: </= 15...hxg4?!;  and now  16.h5!, ""  
       White is supposed to get a promising King-side attack. ]   

 

 16.gxh5 
This is the most popular move at the master level, according to the statistics of the "Mega" Database.   

     [ Also possible is: 16.Bxf6, "+/="  in this position for White. ]  

 

 16...a4!?  
My main database has around fifty games in it with this position, although this game is the first one listed. 

min09_pos2.gif, 10 KB

  3q1rk1/3bppb1/3p1np1/1pr1n1BP/p2NP2P/1BN2P2/PPPQ4/1K1R3R w  

 

All of this is covered in Chapter 28, (pg. # 285); of the book, "The Soltis Variation of The Yugoslav Attack," by NM Steve Mayer.   

     [ After the moves: (>/=) 16...Nxh517.Nd5 Re818.a3, "+/="   
       White is only slightly better. (This represents a possible improvement over the game.)   

       See the master contest:  GM Nigel Short (2610) - GM Kiril Georgiev (2580);   
       FIDE (men's) Olympiad / Novi Sad, YUG; 1990
       {This struggle was eventually drawn, it took fifty-one total moves.} ]   

 

 17.Bd5  
Is this White's most accurate move?   

     [ NM Steve Mayer gives:   17.h6 Bh818.Bd5?   
       It seems hard to believe, but this natural-looking move is not White's best play here.   

           * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *     * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *     * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *   

            ( A popular reference work gives: >/= 18.h7+! Nxh7; 19.Bd5 b4;  
               The end of the column.    
               20.Nce2 Nxg5!?;  21.hxg5 e6!?;  22.Nf4! Bg7[];  23.Ndxe6!!,  "--->"  ('')   
               when White gets a blistering attack here.   

                See the contest: Garcia - Kudrin; / Salamanca, ESP; 1989.   
                [ See MCO-14, page # 269; col. # 01 and note # (f.). ] )   

           * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *     * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *     * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *   

       18...Kh7!;   "~"   (maybe "<=>")  when Black has chances.     

       See the master-level contest:  
       T. Ernst
- B. Alterman; Manila, PHI; (OL) / 1992.  (Search for this game.)  
       {Black won this particular go-round ...} ]  

 

 17...b4  ('!?')   
The standard way of playing this position for Black, but  17...NxP/h5;  might pose more problems for the first player to solve. 

 

 18.Nce2 e6?! (Possibly just - '?')   
This traps the White Bishop in the center of the board, but gives White a vicious assault on the BK. 

 

     [ Better was:  >/=  18...Nxd5!19.exd5 b3!;  "~"  
        when Black might have good chances to defend. 
        (Also - IM A. Sznapik gave 19...RxP/d5; in Informant # 44.) ]    

 

 19.h6! Bh8  
And this position was the CG "Problem of The Day" for Saturday; August 11th, 2007.  

min09_pos3.gif, 10 KB

  3q1rkb/3b1p2/3ppnpP/2rBn1B1/pp1NP2P/5P2/PPPQN3/1K1R3R w  

 

Study this set-up carefully.   

 

     [ A better defense might have been (instead): 19...Bxh620.Bxh6 exd521.Bxf8,  "+/-"   
        however, it would not have allowed Black to escape the certain loss of the game. ]   

 

  **************************************************************************************************  

Now it is basically a problem ... "White to move and win."    
 20.h7+! Kxh721.h5! exd5?   
This is suicide, the Black King should not remain on the open file for any length of time. 
(Maybe just - '??' here.)   

     [ >/= 21...Kg7[]22.hxg6! Nxg623.Nf4! exd524.Qh2, ("+/-") ]   

 

White's next move is the dreaded  ... ... ...  "double-check."   
 22.hxg6+ Kg8  
Fritz 10  'thinks'  that  22...Kg7  was just a little less awful. (Black still loses.)   

 

 23.Rxh8+! Kxh824.Bxf6+!,  "+/-"    
Black resigns, as he cannot stop White from playing the Queen to the h6-square ... (which would result in a quick mate). [This game is also annotated in Volume # 44 of "The Informant" series, see game # 264.]  

A nice miniature and also a good example of how White should handle the assault on Black's King in this particular sub-system of the Dragon. 

 

   Copyright (c) A.J. Goldsby, 2007. All rights reserved.  

 

   1 - 0   


Click  HERE  to - go to or return - to my  HOME PAGE  ... for this site.  

Click  HERE  to go (or return) to my site map (page).  

Click  HERE  to go to my  "Annotated Games II"  (page).   

Click  HERE  to go (or return) to my {2nd} main page on miniatures / or "Best Short Games," (Vol. IV.) 
 (Or you could use the "Back Button" on your web browser.)  


     Copyright (c) LM A.J. Goldsby I    

Copyright () A.J. Goldsby, 2011.  All rights reserved. 

  *******  

  This page was created in August, 2007.    It was posted: Saturday; August 11th, 2007.    It was last updated on: July 14, 2012 02:16 AM


  "A Counter" (counter.gif)